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jaume-pinya:

Massimo CARSETTI

jaume-pinya:

Massimo CARSETTI

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a-c-howard:

Coley Ogg

a-c-howard:

Coley Ogg

Permalink via mughalshit via artspotting 85 notes
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mughalshit:

Prayer Rug
Kashmir, Mughal, 18th century
Wool pile on cotton and silk foundation

Paradise in Islam is described as a walled garden filled with flowers and cypress trees. Depictions of paradise in Islamic art often include a colorful garden of flowers sheltered by an arched gateway symbolic of the entrance to heaven. This artistic metaphor appears on textiles, architectural tile panels, and other objects, but is an especially appropriate decorative motif for prayer rugs. It is a visual reminder of the pleasures of paradise awaiting the faithful who pray. Flowers burst forth from a single vase in the field of this carpet and fill a curved niche defined by flanking cypress trees and floral spandrels. The extremely fine weave of this pashmina wool prayer rug, with approximately 700 knots per square inch, gives it a luxurious, velvetlike appearance. This mille-fleurs type of prayer rug was produced in Mughal India and later copied by weavers in southern Persia.

mughalshit:

Prayer Rug

Kashmir, Mughal, 18th century

Wool pile on cotton and silk foundation

Paradise in Islam is described as a walled garden filled with flowers and cypress trees. Depictions of paradise in Islamic art often include a colorful garden of flowers sheltered by an arched gateway symbolic of the entrance to heaven. This artistic metaphor appears on textiles, architectural tile panels, and other objects, but is an especially appropriate decorative motif for prayer rugs. It is a visual reminder of the pleasures of paradise awaiting the faithful who pray. Flowers burst forth from a single vase in the field of this carpet and fill a curved niche defined by flanking cypress trees and floral spandrels. The extremely fine weave of this pashmina wool prayer rug, with approximately 700 knots per square inch, gives it a luxurious, velvetlike appearance. This mille-fleurs type of prayer rug was produced in Mughal India and later copied by weavers in southern Persia.

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lockbuch:

Beatrice Oettinger, Adaiha, Lat 52.543250 lon 13.382396

lockbuch:

Beatrice Oettinger, Adaiha, Lat 52.543250 lon 13.382396

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bleaken:

vintage & nature blog
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savage-america:

New Orleans ‘36

savage-america:

New Orleans ‘36

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a-c-howard:

John Blackburn

a-c-howard:

John Blackburn

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celestialsloth:

my favourite person

celestialsloth:

my favourite person